Category: Plants | Habitats

Kelp is a kind of seaweed that hold on to a rock on the ocean floor, And grows fast toward the sunlight, Whipping back and forth as forth as the ocean roars. (from Kelp Forest Dancing by Birdsong and the Eco-Wonders) Dear Friends, There is so much to learn about the tall, fast-growing seaweed called kelp or giant kelp. In this blog post, you can learn more about kelp with videos, music, photos, coloring pages and fun facts. The YouTube video above (produced by Little Saigon TV) features a Vietnemese-American student who interviews participants in the annual KelpFest in Laguna Beach, California. (The first minute of the video is in Vietnemese, but don't worry if you don't understand the language. All the interviews are in English). Watch this video and find out why so many people in Laguna Beach celebrate Giant Kelp each year. You can also watch a live web cam of the kelp forest at the Monterey Bay Aquarium when you go to their website. There you will see in real time the many creatures that visit the kelp forest looking for food and shelter. How many of those creatures can you name? Visit the informative NOAA Ocean Service website, and you can learn the names of the many invertabrates, fish, marine mammals and birds that benefit from the kelp forest when you. There you will also see that Kelp are very simple organisms that consist of a holdfast, a stipe, and blades. See these parts of kelp in the photos below and visit the NOAA website page to learn more about the important functions of the holdfast, a stipe, and blades. You can also download the kelp forest coloring book, courtesy of Coast Cartoon Studio.

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Dear Friends, In this video, you can listen to the chorus of my new song, The Flowers have Gone Wild!. Did you know that: Most plants require the assistance of pollinators to produce seeds and fruit? Pollinators include birds, beetles, bees, butterflies, wasps and flies, ants, bats and moths? Pollinators visit flowers in search of food, mates, shelter and nest-building materials? The sugar in a flower's nectar and the protiens, fats, vitamins and minerals from its pollen provide food and energy for pollinators? This energy helps pollinators grow and provides power for their metamorphosis, flight and reproduction? Most wildflowers are fertilized when pollinators visit the flower and then carry pollen from flower to flower? A flower need to be fertilized in order to be produce seeds and fruit? Without pollinators and fertilized flowers the world of nature (including people) would go hungry? Therefore, the relationship between flowers and pollinators feeds the world? These are some of the interesting facts I learned as I was writing my kids song about wildflowers, called The Flowers have Gone Wild! You can learn more about wildflowers and their pollinators on a great website by the US Forest Service called Celebrating Wildflowers. You can also hear the chorus to my new kids song in the video below. The video also has photos of wildflowers taken this past Spring in Laguna Beach, CA and Anza Borrego State Park, CA. You can find the lyrics to The Flowers have Gone Wild! in my last blog entry.

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Listen to the chorus of THE FLOWERS HAVE GONE WILD!

Category: Plants | Habitats

Published: Thursday, June 16, 2011

Dear Friends, In this video, you can listen to the chorus of my new song, The Flowers have Gone Wild!. I have also changed some of the words in the verses since my last blog entry. The new words to the lyrics are at the very end of this letter. Here are some of the words I am using in my new song about wildflowers: wildflowers, bugs, pollinate, pollination, fertilized, pollen, germination, seeds, fruit, colors, blooming, flowers, Spring, bees, beetles, birds and sun. They are all connected to wildflowers in some way. See if you can find these words in the lyrics of the song below. Perhaps you know some other words that are part of the world of wildflowers.

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Dear Friends, Here's some of the words I am using in my new song about wildflowers:wildflowers, insects, bugs, pollinate, pollination, fertilization, pollen, nectar, petals, leaves, seeds, fruit, colors, blooming, Spring, bees, beetles, birds and butterflies. They are all connected to wildflowers in some important way. See is you can find these words in the lyrics of the song below. I felt so much joy and excitement when I saw wildflowers blooming this Spring that I started writing a new song called The Flowers have Gone Wild! Since my last blog entry, I've added more verses to the chorus which you can see below. As I write this song, I am learning about the kinds of insects that pollinate wildflowers. They include bees...

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Dear Friends, It's impossible to learn about wildflowers without learning about the insects and other creatures that pollinate them. It's a give-take relationship for sure! The nectar and pollen of wildflowers provide food and energy for bugs; and the bugs pollinate the wildflowers while they are drinking and eating the nectar and pollen. The pollinated flowers then produce fruit and seeds that make more wildflower plants to feed the pollinating insects and other animals. It's an amazing circle called the web of life! Wildflowers help insects and insects help wildflowers. It's a win-win relationship for everyone involved. Yes, indeed, wildflowers and insects are connected! I felt so much joy and excitement when I saw wildflowers blooming this Spring that I started writing a new song. I'm calling this song, The Flowers have Gone Wild! Since my last blog entry, I've added a verse to the chorus which you can see below. As I write this song, I am learning about the kinds of insects that pollinate wildflowers. They include bees, beetles, butterflies, wasps, ants and moths. What wildflowers and pollinating insects have you observed in your own backyards, parks and neighborhoods? CLICK HERE to tell me about them or to send photos. Below you can see photos of some of the wildflowers in my neighborhood in Laguna Beach, California.

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Dear Friends, It's Spring and the wildflowers are blooming! I am grateful for last Winter's rain and snow because it gave the plants enough water and energy to now make it possible for them to bloom with such beautiful flowers. I've been taking lots of walks and discovering the different colors, shapes and sizes of wildflowers in my neighborhood and local park. I especially enjoy watching insects landing on a flower to drink that flower's nectar, while at the same time pollinating it. It's exciting to hear the bumblebees buzzing and see the moths and butterflies fluttering near the flowers whose colors have caught their attention. I felt so much joy and excitement when I saw those wildflowers blooming this Spring that I started singing a brand new song. I'm calling this song, The Flowers have Gone Wild! You can see the chorus to the song below. In order to write the rest of the song, I want to find out more about wildflowers and what makes them bloom, as well as what kind of incests are drawn to them. What wild flowers and pollinating insects have you observed in your own backyards, parks and neighborhoods? CLICK HERE to tell me about them or to send photos. Below you can see photos of some of the wildflowers in my neighborhood in Laguna Beach, California.

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